An enclosed / weatherproof trike

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Oct 19, 2012
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The problem with any other profile than angle is attaching the panels. Angle gives a nice inside edge to glue them to and then run that same glue around the outer panel / angle joint to seal it. Round in particular provides a number of issues in that regard. Round would be great for stretching tent material around but not flat panels. My problem is in sourcing the size of angle I'd want. I can get 20x20x1.5 stamped but doubt it'd be strong enough but the next size up is 16x16x3 which adds 10kg or so. I did find one supplier of 15x15x2 in stainless only though and a whopping price - enough to be too much. 2mm angle appears largely the preserve of aluminium so maybe I need to try some aluminium soldering as it'd save 13-14 kg over the 16x16x3 steel. It's only supporting it's own weight so not a critical failure point.

The design above has a 90 degree bend in the steering. Perhaps I'm missing something and more detailed plans explain it. I see a few were built on the wooden ones you linked though. I see the issue with an overly wide track you mentioned in many of those too. The body on mine is barely wider than me with the tapered front.
 
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Hi
Have you considered box section cut in 2, plenty of sizes and thickness to choose from.
If you need extra strenght make into a U shape.
Failing that, I work with sheet metal companies, I can try to get some strips of sheet bent for you.
How much do you need?
 
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The problem with any other profile than angle is attaching the panels. Angle gives a nice inside edge to glue them to and then run that same glue around the outer panel / angle joint to seal it.
As Pegasus says make your own angle from square tubing if you are not happy with 20x20x1.5 although in m/s I would have though that is more than adequate as you say this is ONLY a shell with a trike sat underneath it and with the top removable the sides not have to stand the loads of you getting in and out of it ?

I would suggest the above angle and 1.5mm plywood would make an exceedingly strong stiff structure , the other option is build it from 1.5mm plywood in the stich and glue method used for boats ?

The design above has a 90 degree bend in the steering. Perhaps I'm missing something and more detailed plans explain it. I see a few were built on the wooden ones you linked though.
These are being taken slightly out of context ? they were build in countries where due to petrol shortages there were almost no cars on the roads during WW2 so they were 'family cars ' a sort of pedal version of the Austin 7 !

I have a book about the Scandinavian vehicles [ but it is out on loan ] with more pictures of the steering , basically there are bobbins and cord transferring the motion.

There is a part of the plans missing :-



The other page shows the chassis and steering , however they were only really pointers and construction was difficult so many plans were sold and few made.

I included them because they show a driver so measure your height and then use a drawing program to scale the plans so they are say 1/5th scale for you then print them out and see how they compare to the real world ? get some card board and mock the front up etc.

You have no said where you intend using this vehicle ? I have 'owned ' a Velomobile , every year contemplate build my own and then when out on my Python doing my usually weekly trips realise that my cycling environment is NOT Velomobile friendly at all and so it would get little/no use , so back to dreaming.

I see the issue with an overly wide track you mentioned in many of those too. The body on mine is barely wider than me with the tapered front.
The track was not an issue in the context/period of the design as it was used on the road in place of a car.



good stuff here :-Short history good text & pictues

interesting stuff here :- https://motorbicycling.com/threads/velocars-and-other-interesting-vehicles.34913/
 
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I understand now with the bobbin and cord. Such a design, but with cogs and chain, may be useful here too to give a better handlebar angle. I'd need to have a look at the time of actually building it to visualise it better but it's certainly interesting. Dreaming - there's certainly an element of that here too. I don't really have a use for a velomobile but I get plenty of pleasure out of making things.

There's about 17-20m of angle there so i wouldn't really fancy splitting that much box. Thanks for the offer of acquiring some but I think I intend to have a go at aluminium soldering. I've thought about it for many other projects and never got round to it so now looks like a good time to learn.
 
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This gets the wheels outside with a metal frame :-Kinner

This is close to want ?



Dimensioned !

There is a Velomobile called a cab bike it was a basic tub split at the top of the sides and could have either an open top cockpit with head rest or a enclosed cockpit - the best of both worlds really as the example you are looking at would be very uncomfortable in the UK when the suns out ?

Cab-bike

Paul

Some other good stuff here :- Kinneri pedalcar
 
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I don't think I have any deities but I could use some sif 555 rods please. Let me know how much. Thanks. I'd need enough to make the canopy and some spare for practice. Even if I end up modifying the design or not making it at all it'll be no loss having the rods.

The Kenneir pedalcar link doesn't work and google throws up no results for it. Love the first link there though - many interesting ideas. The design above can't have a floor as your feet look close to scraping the floor at the pedals lowest point but it does highlight that there's no need for the front wheels to be in the "traditional" SWB place. I take your point about a removable canopy. The canopy in my mind would remove via a QR on it's hinge but then would have to be left at home. Not ideal I admit. I'll need to ponder on if I can modify matters to make it a convertible.
 
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Latest incarnation.
Pedals moved forward to narrower part of body which will reduce the track to the minimum.
Steering using 2 cogs and chain to give a better handlebar angle more akin to a car.
" Bonnet" is made of clear acrylic hinged at the front and has a triangular fillet of clear polythene glued to it. Rear edge of bonnet goes up on an over-centre hinge to create a sloped windscreen.
Canopy is made of two sheets of clear acrylic on a canvas waterproofed hinge (top rear) with clear polythene sides allowing it to fold shut for storage behind the seat. Rear sheet fits to body via pole and hole and polythene uses those plastic magnetic strips to fasten to the outside of the body. Roof sheet fastens to bonnet / windscreen via a continuous strip of those same magnets. I'll need a strip of polythene at the bottom rear too to run water outside the floor.

Somewhat more complicated, slightly lighter, no internal storage though a rack could be attached over the rear wheel. Has the advantage of being able to have the windscreen up or down without the roof and could facilitate that change on the move even.


 
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Seen that and love it. I want something a little more velo and a little less kiddies pedal car though I appreciate a lot of that is in the eye of the beholder
Sorry posted than on wrong thread , there is someone else on here wanted to use a bath

Link fixed in posting , added it here as well Kenneri pedal car

keep at it paul
 
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Don't forget you need feet holes in the front under the pedals ?

These allow your heels to poke out underneath stopping it being to tall,
and
These allow a Fred Flintstone reverse , necessary as you can't reach the front wheels to move it like a wheelchair.

Paul
 
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Love that wooden one with the Lamborghini doors. Very eye catching and a great inclusion. This has got me thinking about a much simpler and fast erect canopy. Will ponder it some more and be back on it.

I'm deliberately not wanting holes in the floor. I appreciate it makes the bonnet taller requiring a more vertical or a more raised seat and also (possibly, though expecting to avoid) shorter crank arms. I'm wanting to get this as weatherproof as is likely possible without a one-piece carbon or glass structure. Reversing would require the body to be raised to place the feet outside the floor. Not ideal but doable given it'll be held down by over-centre gas rams and probably a couple of QR clips within easy reach and, I feel, a good trade off for keeping weather out. I can't avoid some holes for the drive chain and steering but I can keep them small and use bristles around them.

I'm currently considering aluminium chequer plate for the floor. It'll not make a racket like thin metal will with rattles and road spray. Ply is also under consideration for the same reason though ply, like thin metal, will require an outer steel frame where the chequer will not. If weight is accidentally placed on the ply it's not going to survive though. The issue will be the curving of ally. The floor only bears the weight of the canopy / body but accidents do happen and I'd like it to survive such a mishap. Any material will require some triangulation back to the flat from the fore and aft sections to reduce flex
 
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All so obvious in retrospect. The Lambo doors gave me the inspiration. The canopy "roof" is made of clear acrylic with its leading edge fastened to the long sloping bonnet / windscreen via a canvas waterproofed hinge allowing it to fold forward flat to the bonnet. Because it's clear acrylic it's still possible to use with the screen raised but no top up. The sides of the canopy are again clear acrylic and are hinged to the roof via another canvas waterproofed hinge. The sides fasten to the rear of the body via post and hole when up and fall flat to the sides of the body when folded forward with plastic hinge strips stopping them flapping. The rear of the canopy is another bit of clear acrylic with magnetic mounting to the sides again via a canvas hinge. It will fold over the roof and then the roof and rear will fold forward when not in use. There will be gaps that need some measure of filling via closed cell foam or draught / rain excluder no doubt. The side screen to polythene fillet being the obvious bit. I'm actually fairly chuffed at this idea but would rather be deflated now if someone could find fault than later. The overhead is a view of the canopy laid flat ready to be erected or folded flat to the bonnet. The entirety of the canopy is clear acrylic rather than polythene so will give a better view and erection (oo-er) is seconds, hopefully without even having to get out.





 
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I don't think gear + chain steering will work very well , it will be difficult to keep under tension [ especially if any part of it flex's when ridden ] and the chain will introduce backlash which is undesirable.

It would be better implemented like this , or a variation of ?



The part your steering wheel is fastened to can always be made to telescope towards the dashboard to allow you to get in and out ?

Paul
 
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This is for stormbird.
Is it possible for you to take a photo of the pages of the booklet, I read Swedish and it would be fun to read the instructions.
Hi there

This is the book I have :- Folkhemmets-farkoster

However I won't get it back till after I have been to Holland - mid July

I would love someone to tell me if any of the pages are technical details and what they say.

regards Paul
 
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Winnipeg, Manitoba
I am very interested in an enclosed trike as well. My Warrior trike is now going on 4 years and 4,000 km's traveled. I have built 2 different bodies for it to test out different styles and construction methods. Coroplast has been my go to material for body panels. The first body started as an internal round stock metal frame, 2 piece, front hinged up at the end of the boom and rear was the tail section which tapered to a point and had built in panniers. The coro was fastened to the frame using nylon ties, hot glue then was covered with Dacron aircraft cloth. It worked well and was fairly easy to pedal despite the weight. One real plus was the warmth the body provided due to wind protection, the first test ride was done at minus 10 C and a sweater (plus gloves) was all that was needed to stay warm while pedaling. The big drawback turned out to be the frame of the trike. Mine has a rear hub motor so through trial and error gussets were found to be necessary at all frame bends. But having the body pivoting off the front of the boom was too much and caused the boom to bend down. That was repaired by cutting the boom, bending it back up and rewelding it. So that body sits by the side of my house. On to style 2, this one used a frame of 1" aluminum angles pop riveted together to form a shape. The rear tail had the built in panniers again but this time did not go to a point. A suicide type door was built on the curb side, here that's the right side and a large hatch covered the top and it opened to the left side. That gave lot's of room to get in and out and when the hatch was closed it provided a solid mechanical method of securing the door. Because type number 1 placed so much weight and strain on the Warrior frame number 2 had 4 solid mounting arms bolted to the frame for body support. Both bodies had the front wheels inside the body with internal fenders. Conclusion was number 2 was a little too tight in the shoulder area so not really comfortable. It also had a flat stubby front end that was not eye pleasing. And since it's summer here now it was way to warm inside. The front part of the body has now been removed leaving just the rear tailbox and thats how it's been ridden since spring. Main takeaway from my experiment is the Warrior is not a great candidate for a body but it is a great trike.
 
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I have seen a car that was made from a glass fiber boot that he turned upside down and it looked good.

I was looking also for an enclosure, but I wait and see what I do. Maybe I make one in the future. I love to have a closed one so I dit dry in the rain.
 
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