Drypod 2

Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
957
Location
Wakefield, UK
A coincidence you should post that picture Paul. I was just pondering that very vehicle earlier. I was especially considering the pedal crank and wondering if I could or should incorporate something similar. My head should be as close to central in the canopy as I can foresee at this point. Once I'm essconced in the seat I can set the final height of it above the body. Creating a sliding part equals a body joint which would be almost impossible to seal. I'd also need to create a sliding mechanism which would add weight. The Thermhex is certainly strong enough to carry the weight of itself and canopy and won't flex much even under raising and lowering it. By making the body and canopy essentially one piece I can better seal it. I'll try to incorporate a pair of tailgate rams to pop it open with a simple strap to bring it down and a latch or two to keep it there.

I'm already having a much better feeling that this is the right way to go when compared to the Drypod Mk1. The Mk1 threw up many issues. So long as this is strong enough I currently foresee nothing unmanageable. If it's not strong enough I get a sheet of 18mm and start again. Should anyone be foolish enough to follow me here's my cutting plans. Alter the size of the seat squab and brace to suit your own seat and frame. There's just enough spare to cover most seat types.

 
Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
957
Location
Wakefield, UK
Got the seat in. Surprisingly that has taken me a good 5 hours to achieve. I expected less. You can see that the lower mount sits right above the seat bracer and why the seat shelf was so short. All the force is sent into wood mounted vertically, at it's strongest. The upper mount has a 100mm x 100mm spreader plate against the wood. I've also used some aluminium angle and stainless bolts to reinforce the seat to vertical wood joins. This may have been unnecessary but it's made me more confident of it staying together. It was somewhat less than fun getting to the rear of some bolts via the newly bored access holes as that underseat structure makes an enclosed box section. I've sat in it with the front and rear lifted slightly and can report no issues or even creaking. I appreciate that's not the same as any loading it'll get in use but it'll for now. The woodwork looks quite wide when set against the seat but it's very snug in there. Next job will be to get a rear wheel and it's suspension on and by then I may have the materials to start on the front suspension.







 
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Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
957
Location
Wakefield, UK
Rear wheel part way in:-





I say part way as there's a brace to weld in between the two suspension mounting plates. As the suspension compresses it wants to move the two mountings apart. A brace between the two will go a long way to keeping the wood intact. The shock mount uses the back of the seat mount so hopefully my weight will absorb some of the load. Unfortunately this is where the wooden chassis shows it's weak side in that both mounts are central to the chassis where it's weakest. I may also need to tie the mounts in to the side panels (frankly I expect to need to).
 
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Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
957
Location
Wakefield, UK
Added the main rear bracing. It doesn't look much but this really makes a massive difference to the load on the wood. Bouncing on the back the suspension seemed quite compliant yesterday. Today it's quite hard. The difference is yesterday the wood was flexing alarmingly and today it's not. I will forgo any further bracing for now though I do have plans to tie the front and rear together with some steel to stop the wood twisting. I'm now expecting that to be all that's needed.



 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
277
Location
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Looking good. Any plans to paint or coat the plywood, especially the parts open to the elements? I know when I built my small off road teardrop style trailer a few years ago I coated the underside with a tar like substance to water proof it. It prevents the plywood from de-laminating.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
957
Location
Wakefield, UK
I'm definitely putting something on the wood. My initial thoughts are some truck bed liner. Tough and waterproof though I'm unsure how well it'd stick to wood. I'm very open to any suggestions as my wood knowledge is pretty minimal.

I started work on the front suspension today. Oh the fun I had when I discovered the 15mm x 1.5mm stainless seamless tube I'd ordered for the pivoting parts turned out to be 15mm x 16swg. My 12mm drill bit is now fit for nothing after reaming into the tube, 16 ends worth, so the flanged bearings will fit. Guess how far I'd got before figuring out the size issue? - no prizes - too easy! Oh the joys of drilling stainless. I only ordered stainless for this as it was cheaper than mild whereas I deliberately chose stainless for the spreader plates as it just offers much more resistance to being deformed than mild for the same weight but drilling those is massively easier than reaming tube.
 
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