Ed's 'StreetRunner' Quad Build

Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
900
Location
Wakefield, UK
I've had a nibbler for years. They are VERY air hungry. A 14CFM compressor is generally required to run them without stopping (think 3hp and twin cylinder). The horseshoes it throws out get everywhere. You feel your feet snicking the carpet in the house and realise several have lodged in the soles of your shoes. Keep the cutting bits well lubed and have a spare or two. I've snapped several, usually at times I don't have a spare! A good tip is to use a pair of G-clamps and a straight bit of whatever alongside any straight you wish to cut rather than do it freehand.
 
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Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
I've had a nibbler for years. They are VERY air hungry. A 14CFM compressor is generally required to run them without stopping (think 3hp and twin cylinder). The horseshoes it throws out get everywhere. You feel your feet snicking the carpet in the house and realise several have lodged in the soles of your shoes. Keep the cutting bits well lubed and have a spare or two. I've snapped several, usually at times I don't have a spare! A good tip is to use a pair of G-clamps and a straight bit of whatever alongside any straight you wish to cut rather than do it freehand.
Thanks for the tips. And yes, I've discovered those horseshoes....1000's of them....everywhere.
I'm running the nibbler at 90 CFM which is recommended. So it doesn't take long to draw down my compressor.
But it's only a couple of minutes, while waiting for it to build back up. Even while running, it can't replenish fast enough, so I wait.
I'm a patient man, ......sometimes.

Maybe the more I use it, the faster I will go..
 
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Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
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Apple Valley, California, USA
It's been raining 🐱 and 🐶 for the last couple of days.

But I managed to get a little work done.

Finished cutting out the first panel.
I may have to buy a second panel.


Cutting this out on the floor, isn't the best thing for ones back.
I tried to move this 4 x 10 sheet, up on to some saw horses, but it was too wobbly, thus making it hard to lift into place, by myself.
I think I added a couple more mild creases. (Look at the upper left corner, where it reflects the overhead light)
Anyway, I don't remember doing it, nor seeing them there before now.

I think I have enough undamaged area, to do both sides, and maybe the lower back.
The top will probably require another piece.

Also need to purchase a new roll of .025 MIG wire. The roll I have, is about 6-7 years old, and has surface issues.
Unless someone knows how to clean an unused roll of welding wire.
I will be doing a lot of tacking, and spot welds, so it needs to be clean.
Learned from YouTube, last night about another way to make spot welds (plug/rosette welding)...with MIG
Welding them without having to drill holes in the top material.
Haven't tried the technique yet, but seems quite, easy......thus the need for the .025 welding wire.

So ladies and gentlemen it's time to close down for tonight.
 
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Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
248
Location
Lanc's, England
Unless someone knows how to clean an unused roll of welding wire.
If you have some scotchbrite handpad, a coarser grit works best.
Cut a small strip, fold it as many times as needed.
Push the wire through the scotchbrite fold, place between the wire spool and the drive wheel.
The wire will be cleaned as it get pulled through the scotchbrite.
 
Joined
May 31, 2013
Messages
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Location
South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
^^^ This from popshot and also, I have always found that the surface issues only extend to the outer layer(s) and you can strip them off and find "clean" wire underneath.
The little clean and lube pads you can buy are a really great idea.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
If you have some scotchbrite handpad, a coarser grit works best.
Cut a small strip, fold it as many times as needed.
Push the wire through the scotchbrite fold, place between the wire spool and the drive wheel.
The wire will be cleaned as it get pulled through the scotchbrite.
^^^ This from popshot and also, I have always found that the surface issues only extend to the outer layer(s) and you can strip them off and find "clean" wire underneath.
The little clean and lube pads you can buy are a really great idea.
Good ideas, thanks guy's. I'll give it a try.

Just as soon as I can see my shop through the fog.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Well I tried :(

Got a brand new ScotchBrite
Cut it into a couple of strips, and rolled up one.
I unrolled about 20 feet of wire, and used the pad to clean that amount.



Removed the .030 wire spool, and installed the .025 spool.


Houston.....we have a problem !



To my surprise, :eek: my drive roller, is only for .030 and .035.
Not a huge thing, but the research I've done, recommends using .024/.025.
The welder use chart shows that, I can use .030, on a setting of 2 and 30 wire speed.
I guess I'll have a go with those settings just to see what trouble I may encounter.




Now I'm wondering, just where did I get that roll of .025.
Maybe the roller on my old Harbor Freight, welder had a .024/25 roller. hmmmmm :unsure:😕
 
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Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
248
Location
Lanc's, England
Run the wire in the narrow grove. If it works it works.
What's printed on the other side of the drive wheel?
I don't like mini spooles, the wire feeds trough the tip like a corkscrew.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Run the wire in the narrow grove. If it works it works.
What's printed on the other side of the drive wheel?
I don't like mini spooles, the wire feeds trough the tip like a corkscrew.
* Yup ! I thought the same thing...It Didn't.
In the narrow/smaller grove, which is actually for .030, it just slipped.
I tightened the tension knob way past what it would normally be, and it still was so loose I could move it in or out.

* It's printed the same on both sides. (.030 & .035 )
I normally only use .030 for all my welding, therefore a large spool. But for this project I wanted to try .025, as it generates less heat, which would be better, due to my using 20 gauge sheet metal.

* Need to explain this one 😕
Not sure how being a mini spool, would cause that to happen, past the tension wheel.
Maybe if the gun contact tip was to large, wrong size or worn.
(Which reminds me, that if I'm going to use .025, I will need to get some .025 tips)
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
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Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Weather is cool, bright and clear.

Opened the shop, to the 🌞

Felt like working on the first panel, and dialing it in, for tack welding.
Learning how to finesse, the air nibbler. Going a bit quicker than when I first started.

A bit more, 'nibbling', and this panel can be tacked in place.
That is, after I put my welder back together.

 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
One & Done

First panel tack welds are in place. Finish welds later.
Not much else to say, other than .....no hits, no runs, no errors.......I think.

Oh!, I left out the 1 x 1/8 forms I made. While working the panel into place, it became obvious,
that they really weren't need. And the result was pretty close to what I wanted, anyway.





 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
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Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
OMG it's ...Friday the 13th.:eek:

First thing this morning I finished spot welding in the right panel.
Those two panels turned out OK, but not without a bit of concern, as to how well.


Now on to the front

Apparently the only bad luck I've had today, is the first template for the front.
The paper template fit pretty close, so I thought, all that was going to be needed, was some light trimming.

Not so. The first template was all one piece. thus making the curved ends and getting the length right,
a bit of a challenge. So I opted to just use two separate pieces, to be joined later.



These curved ends are still in the 'rough in' stage. More grinding and shaping to come.



It's 2 pm, and I've been working on this steady for the last 4.5 hours. Time to take a seat, and get off the feet.

 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
It's been cold, damp, and windy, so not to desirable, to go out and work on the StreetRunner.

While thumbing through some of my past build pictures, I happened upon this one.
It made me think that when I get this first body done, I could do a roadster version.



The way I have designed this body to attach, (and detach), it would be little effort to swap out the two.
Actually there is potential for a number of body styles.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Still too uncomfortable for long serious work.
Could warm the shop, but I'm out of propane...which reminds me.

But had to do something while I let the 'girls' roam around awhile.

Second attempt at making the side template.



 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
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Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Practical, or not, it's going to be a work of art when it is finished. The feeling of being finished is going to be almost overwhelming. The first trip will be to the bottle shop?
True Enough.

The term 'Its always been a dream of mine', is very often IMO, but a cliche, for many.

Not that people don't have dreams, (see my signature block).

What you see happening before you, is in fact, a dream of mine, since the late 1950's - 1960's.
Living in California in those years, was my first introduction to, 'Hot Rods', of all shapes, sizes, and creativeness.
My previous attempts, were met with less than satisfactory results.

THIS, is my Hot Rod, my dream, coming true.
Maybe not down the road in the direction, I had imagined , or how I had imagined,
but none the less, it's my dream in the making.

This website, and the people on it, are my constant incentive.......thank you to all.
 
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Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,848
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
I guess my nibbler has bit the dust.
I tried it again, and it won't take more than a couple of nibbles, and then jambs.
Really can't see what the reason is . Back to the trusty grinder and cutting discs.
Anyway, the weather was good enough to get outside and cut out the first of two side panels.



Here I have cut out relief notches for the welds from the top panel.
I'll tack weld in the same area, and then grind everything smooth.



Trial fit. Bottom of panel bent into place.



Final fit, prior to welding in place. It's held in place with magnets on reverse side.


 
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