First Tomahawk build - Seeking advice

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Aug 30, 2019
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Hi everyone!

Hoping to start building my first recumbent based on the Tomahawk plans soon, and I'm gathering parts now and have some questions:

General info: I'm ~190cm (6'4") and about ~115kg (~250 pounds). Looking to use the Tomahawk as a daily commuter 10km (~6miles) each direction, 3-5 times a week.

  1. Is there a general estimate for the amount of tubing required to finish the job? I'm guessing a length of 3m (9 feet) will be more than enough (if they even sell me that little).. just wanted to make sure.
  2. Front forks: I could get good quality mountain bike 20" wheels with a suspension fork, but I'm thinking the width could get problematic and get in the way my thighs. Is it important to have a minimal width fork? Is suspension on the front wheel a good thing or unnecessary?
I think that's it for now.. thanks!

-Leav
 
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Hi Leav,

I think that with 3m you can build it.
I don't know how they sell the steel there, but I think that it isn't a problem.

The front fork with is probably not a big problem. I think that as you go for front shocks that it is the construction of the fork.
But you can also make some changes to the frame, so it fits what you want.

I only would ad some mudguards.

Emiel.
 
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Thanks Emiel,

Another question I had (and perhaps this should go to @Radical Brad) is whether at my weight it would be advisable to add gussets or a bit of triangulation to the frame to reduce the stress on the welds.

Any thoughts?
 
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I know that some people added extra suport on surten points of the Warrior frame. I did the same with my changed version.

Most parts will be OK, but where the rear wheel is mounted to the seat, can be a weak point because of the tube that is on his side.
Adfing extra suport is no problem, just don't over do it.

Do you have the pdf?
There you can see all the sizes and see how much material you need. Get a bit more to be save.
 

Radical Brad

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Welcome!

Yes, a few small gussets or even truss tubes taken from old seat stays would help. It is not as much your weight as the combination of 250 pounds hitting a pothole that I would worry about, so extra support would be good.

You could try the suspension later, no loss if it doesn't fit that way.

Brad
 
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Thanks guys.

Yeah I bought the Tomahawk plans, so I'll be following along shortly. I'm trying to get real 20" forks as I'm not eager to do the modifcation suggested in the plans using an Arc welder... with a MIG I could see it being done neatly but my arc welding skills are not that good :)
 
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@Radical Brad Do you think for my height (6'4") I could get away with a 26" front wheel (my inseam is ~85") and avoid the pedal striking the wheel?

Have you seen it done?

(I want to avoid buying/scrounging a 20" fork and wheel, and like I said, I don't feel comfortable DIYing a fork length modification)
 
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Feb 7, 2008
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Hi everyone!

Hoping to start building my first recumbent based on the Tomahawk plans soon, and I'm gathering parts now and have some questions:

General info: I'm ~190cm (6'4") and about ~115kg (~250 pounds). Looking to use the Tomahawk as a daily commuter 10km (~6miles) each direction, 3-5 times a week. -Leav
Where do you plan to commute ?

If you are thinking of mainly on the road you may want to look at a bike that is a bit higher and has the seat more upright allowing you to look directly into the eyes of car drivers , makes them think twice before doing something stupid [ well some of them ;)]
 
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Where do you plan to commute ?

If you are thinking of mainly on the road you may want to look at a bike that is a bit higher and has the seat more upright allowing you to look directly into the eyes of car drivers , makes them think twice before doing something stupid [ well some of them ;)]
It will also make you more visible
 
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Where do you plan to commute ?

If you are thinking of mainly on the road you may want to look at a bike that is a bit higher and has the seat more upright allowing you to look directly into the eyes of car drivers , makes them think twice before doing something stupid [ well some of them ;)]

It's a city commute, but along bike paths pretty much 95% of the way, and sidealks for the remaining 5%.

I was debating the height and visibility (both ways), but I just can't myself to enjoy the look of recumbents like the high-roller.... It's like comparing a giraffe to a cheetah
🐈

Not the best argument, but it's the truth!
 
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You got to like it or you won't finish the build !

It is possible to ride a bike with a small amount of soft interference , i.e heal striking front wheel my Wavey has that ...



However it is positively dangerous to ride with hard interference , i.e pedal/crank striking front wheel !

I do think getting the seat back up towards 50' helps with visibility , well it helps me :)

The Wavey had a laid back seat back and I changed it to be more upright :-

 
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Radical Brad

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With your inseam, I would think for sure a 24" wheel would be possible at least.
Get some 2x2 lumber and mock up something once you cut the bottom bracket form your donor frame.

Brad
 
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