VK3CKC's eLecTricks Trike Design and Build.

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Feb 20, 2013
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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axerail.coffeecup.com
A couple of images from my last weekend. I played the role of Tail-End-Charlie for both the Night Ride (April 26) and the Marathon (April 28) on my modified Warrior.

There was another home built trike (Lloyd, VK2KNS) with me on the 26th and there was a trio of Greenspeed Deltas hooked together in the event. A great way for a couple giving their autistic child a fun ride.

I was the lone Tail-End-Charlie on the 28th. This was the 4th year in this role. A unique record - last every time.

Images still to follow. You don't have a "Reason for edit" in this one Brad?
 
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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Missing images from my previous post:

Some of the 112 riders getting ready for the 32km 2019 O'Keefe Challenge Light The Trail Night Ride, April 26th, from Axedale to Heathcote. VK3CKC was Tail End Charlie.


Tail End Charlie (VK3CKC) crosses the finish line after following the Marathon for 42km from Junortoun to Barrack Reserve, Heathcote.

Radio communications were provided throughout the Marathon with the aid of field stations at strategic places, reporting competitor progress. Last, now four years running, er, pedalling.
 
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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axerail.coffeecup.com
I have now completed the trike LED lighting system - unless I find a fault. Haven't installed the front ones yet but they are ready to go. The lighting now includes: Indicators front and rear, hazard flashers front and rear, white flashing front running light that mimics the operation of the tail light, reversing light, interior light, dashboard repeaters, brake switch detection, and drive for an indicator reminder buzzer - all from one Arduino microcontroller running from a USB supply. The sketch file, BikeLights_V7.0d_48_LED_2019_05_02.ino is available from the Files section of https://groups.io/g/pedalradio. You are free to download and use it. I may look at cleaning up the code at a later date.

I have been using the rear lights with the dashboard repeaters and indicator reminder buzzer for a couple of months without any problems. The dashboard repeaters provide reassurance that the lights are working as they should. Looking forward to having the front ones operating as well. Yippee, another milestone has passed.
 
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The project slowly moves forward.

I decided that I had to make up the front wheels in order to complete the front suspension. This has taken longer than expected with many time consuming interruptions. I am using 48-spoke rims with my own hubs - slightly wider with larger diameter spoke flanges than the original wheels had and also disc brakes added. Only one finished so far. After lacing up with the original 3-cross configuration, I found the original spokes a little too long. I had to redo the lacing with 4-cross and then change the actual over/under spoke configuration. Hope to get that last bit changed this arvo.

I must get a few images arranged. I came up with might be a good idea to manage all those spokes when starting to lace a wheel. I will be able to confirm the method when I start the second wheel.
 
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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axerail.coffeecup.com
How much hair pulling and swearing is usually associated with lacing wheels? If you are like me, there is plenty. The first few spokes go in relatively easy. The further you go, the more you find that the end of the required spoke is much further around the rim or over/under other spokes and only bending or other spoke removal will allow you to reposition it.

I recently laced 48 spokes to a wheel I was building, only to find that the 3-cross pattern I was using was not going to work. It was bad enough getting it done the first time but I had to do it all again with a 4-cross pattern that worked. During this extended exercise, I came up with a method that removed the out-of-place spoke problem. The trick is to initially work out the required pattern, then tie the spokes roughly in their final position. They all end up roughly near their rim holes and none are in the way of any others. This is shown in the following images:

This first image is the mess that happens when you first load all the spokes in the hub.



This next one is the start of placing a wire tie at the place the spokes cross. First, the tie wire is bent in a U shape and placed at the cross, then bent horizontally at right angles.



Next image shows the next stage of the spoke tying, looped around the spokes. Loop around a couple of times to ensure the tie doesn't fall off.



All spokes tied in rough position.



The final part of the job is to offer the tied spokes up to the rim. All that you have to do is thread them through the holes and screw the nipples on. No real pain at all.



So, there you have it. I wish I had thought of it years ago.
 

SirJoey

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Feb 8, 2008
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My cozy little nook in the corner!
Done in true Zombie fashion, sharing your knowledge, learning, & experience!
Laced a few myself, but if I ever have a go again, I'll give this a shot & post it!
Thanx for sharing! Very educational, inspirational, & nicely done! Kudos! (y)

***
 
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May 26, 2011
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238
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Dover, Kent England
How much hair pulling and swearing is usually associated with lacing wheels? If you are like me, there is plenty. The first few spokes go in relatively easy. The further you go, the more you find that the end of the required spoke is much further around the rim or over/under other spokes and only bending or other spoke removal will allow you to reposition it.

I recently laced 48 spokes to a wheel I was building, only to find that the 3-cross pattern I was using was not going to work. It was bad enough getting it done the first time but I had to do it all again with a 4-cross pattern that worked. During this extended exercise, I came up with a method that removed the out-of-place spoke problem. The trick is to initially work out the required pattern, then tie the spokes roughly in their final position. They all end up roughly near their rim holes and none are in the way of any others. This is shown in the following images:

This first image is the mess that happens when you first load all the spokes in the hub.



This next one is the start of placing a wire tie at the place the spokes cross. First, the tie wire is bent in a U shape and placed at the cross, then bent horizontally at right angles.



Next image shows the next stage of the spoke tying, looped around the spokes. Loop around a couple of times to ensure the tie doesn't fall off.



All spokes tied in rough position.



The final part of the job is to offer the tied spokes up to the rim. All that you have to do is thread them through the holes and screw the nipples on. No real pain at all.



So, there you have it. I wish I had thought of it years ago.
I am of same as Sir Joey a work of art solved in Zombie fashion also end of pinched fingers. Thank you.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2013
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Washington state
I myself use a PIC by microchip. I learned SWORDFISH basic and sometimes wish I had learned C or ??

My projects end up on custom made printed circuit boards I design.
One question? are you using mosfets to handle the leds?
If you have a schematic I would be happy to design a circuit board with lots of room to add on bells n whistles to.
Right now I have 20 circuit boards I just received in the mail that need to be assembled.
PCB = 10 boards 100cm x 100cm cost about $1 per board.
 
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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axerail.coffeecup.com
One question? are you using mosfets to handle the leds?
The LEDs are 6 x WS2812 tri-colour 8-LED modules daisy-chained together to form one strip of 48 LEDs - 3 modules for the rear for tail/brake, left/right turn, hazard and reverse lights and 3 modules for the front left/right and a front running light. Each module is about 50mm (2" for those still trying to catch up with the rest of us). I did it this way because the individual LEDs are close together in their modules. Each LED is individually addressable and have their own electronics drivers built in. The only electronics is an Arduino Nano and the LED modules, running off a USB supply. The Nano also drives "dashboard" repeaters so that you always know if they are operating. The whole affair is very cheap. Final wiring is not completed as it is only temporarily on the test trike.

The Arduino source code is available to anyone who wants to play around with it. See post #12 in this thread. Note the libraries that are used. Do a search for WS2812 on BangGood.com for the LED modules.

I will eventually get around to some pictures or video to show it working. I do have some images but not sure if they are good enough. Would prefer a video. You'll just have to be patient.
 
Joined
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South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
I've never had any problems with lacing myself, that looks more bother than its worth to me. But if it works for you..... Enjoy! :D
Wheel-building is a therapeutic and relaxing pastime, I enjoy making up new wheels.
 
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Axedale, Victoria, Australia
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axerail.coffeecup.com
A couple of updates with a testing dashboard mounted on my Warrior trike.


This image is of a temporary testing dashboard that I have added to my Warrior trike to test some of my planned accessories for the eLecTricks trike. This one shows a 10.1" Lenovo tablet as the main display that is showing Ulysse Speedo Pro with a 12V battery monitor at the bottom left. The one at bottom right is not yet connected but will be used to monitor an e-Assist battery so that I can see how to use it most economically.

The silver toggle switch disables everything from the 12V battery which is powering a number of USB supplies mounted behind the main display.



This one shows a MAPS.ME navigation map. It is possible with Ulyssee Speedo to overlay its speed and other items where desired on the map as desired.
 
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USB Power Supplies.


There are 5 individual 5V USB supplies here, used for powering the tablet/s, turn indicators, etc., from the 12V SLA battery. They are a bit rough and ready but will be fine tuned as time goes by. They are mounted in a diecast box behind the main tablet and, while they work, at the moment they don't charge the tablet at the same time as it is operating. I'll get around to that eventually.

Time to get back to the trike construction before the next "sidestep" occurs.
 
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axerail.coffeecup.com
It's going to be a cool rig, like the dashboard.
Brad
I'll be having fun with it before it is migrated in some form to the new one when it is ready. Must remember to look where I am going and at the countryside occasionally while riding. The main display will be mainly used to run my video camera app. As the camera will be out of sight, I will be able to see where it is pointing - with 360 degree rotation.

Now, where did I put that screwdriver?
 
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Another update. I have spent 14 days on a 2-hour job and have a dashboard update for you today.

The single switch at upper left is to connect/disconnect a 12V, 9AH, SLA battery that runs the two digital meters, lighting, and USB supplies.

The 7-switch module below it has 2 switches for disconnecting/disconnecting a 12V, 10W solar panel for keeping the 12V battery topped up and selecting where in the circuit to connect the solar panel.

The digital panel meter at bottom left displays 12V battery voltage, current being supplied, Watts being supplied and total Watts. The meter is settable for both High and Low voltage alarm and selectable 100A or 50A current range.

The central display is a Lenovo 10.1" tablet displaying Ulysse Speedometer.

The switches and LEDs at the right are for lighting, indicators, etc.

The digital meter at bottom right is for monitoring the e-Assist battery and current draw.
 
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