Warrior build Questions

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Sep 17, 2020
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Ohio
I'm looking to start a warrior build,but I'm having a hard time finding old bikes with threaded stems much less matching ones. I have a tube off one that i can use for both sides, as itsover 5", but only one fork. Is there any reason why i can't split the threads from the one fork and weld them onto a tube for both sides and just order a set of bearings, I cant imagine they need 1.5 inches of thread when it looks like the cap only uses the top maybe .25 inches?
 
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Sep 17, 2020
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Ohio
I'm working on my build and up to page 32 it shows the angle of the seat back being 45 degrees. I'm no expert, but wouldn't that be 135 degrees, and if there is a V cut at the top of the tube at a 45 degree angle, it won't match up to the support for the back wheel, which seems to be about a 13.75 degree angle so for the V notch to mate up to the back wheel support, the notch can't be a 45, or the back wheel support would have to be parallel with the ground and not angled up?
 
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Sep 17, 2020
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ok. But if you look at the picture i added, the green circle shows the issue, how once the 45 is tilted to the correct angle it doesn't match the angle of the rear wheel support.
 
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South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
Easily resolved. Built a Street-fox with the Warrior USS and Disc brakes. ;)
 
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May 4, 2013
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Vestaburg, MI
I'm looking to start a warrior build,but I'm having a hard time finding old bikes with threaded stems much less matching ones. I have a tube off one that i can use for both sides, as itsover 5", but only one fork. Is there any reason why i can't split the threads from the one fork and weld them onto a tube for both sides and just order a set of bearings, I cant imagine they need 1.5 inches of thread when it looks like the cap only uses the top maybe .25 inches?
If I remember correctly, in the old site (years ago), there use to be a tutorial for doing just that? Or maybe that was for for shortening a steering tube on a fork. But sounds like you could use that to do what your talking about?
 
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Apr 23, 2020
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Netherlands and France
I'm working on my build and up to page 32 it shows the angle of the seat back being 45 degrees. I'm no expert, but wouldn't that be 135 degrees, and if there is a V cut at the top of the tube at a 45 degree angle, it won't match up to the support for the back wheel, which seems to be about a 13.75 degree angle so for the V notch to mate up to the back wheel support, the notch can't be a 45, or the back wheel support would have to be parallel with the ground and not angled up?
HI Tom, are you by chance building the bike with an 28" rear wheel?
This is what I am doing and have found that your drawing #2 is closest to reality. How did you resolve this?
Best regards, Kiezel
 
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Sep 17, 2020
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Ohio
Sorry I'm just seeing this now. My wheel was a 26" but the angle is wrong in the plans, if you look at the plans for the tomahawkfor a 2 wheel recumbent, he makes the same 45 degree cut and the back wheel supports are parallel to the ground and the upright tube is at a 45 degree angle. The pictures are exactly the same as is most of the text between the two plans and i think it was a matter of copy and paste but the angle didn't line up. I resolved it by making everything else the correct angles then marking the upright tube to get the correct angle to cut it. If i make another one i wont cut the V cut in it until i have the rest of the frame aligned. I then just took a thin piece of woof and clamped it to the back wheel support and put the upright tube against it at the right angle and that gave me a straight edge to mark it and get the correct cut out to match.

Also watch out for the frame height, i don't think the 11" number is correct. If you look at Jons build you'll see how the axle didn't fit under the frame and it messed up his steering. I had the same with my build but raised up the frame so i had clearance for the axle
 
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When I made a 3d model, I noticed that the part where you mount the back of the seat against, isn't right. It isn't a big problem and the dimensions don't really come that exact.
As you do it like in the discription, it will be fine.
You can set the angle right and mount the seat to it, even as the size isn't 19inch.

26inch isn't 26inch. It depends on the tire you use how big the rear and also the fro t wheels are. So there is also a small difference.
 
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@Thom_G @Emiel Thanks for your input. I have corrected the 2x 45 degrees fishmouth to fit the rear fork. Using a piece of cardboard to make a model was enough to do this. I think I did almost the same as you @Thom_G. The 19" rear seat tube has indeed become 0,5" shorter. My seat will probably have some extra supports, since I don't follow the pdf on that part. I bought a premolded chair for recumbents. Any problems on that part have to be solved by me and my imagination.
 
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Oct 19, 2012
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Fibreglass seats are incredibly tolerant of mounting positions. I have four and two are mounted only 12" apart - once underneath and one on the lower back. They are strong enough to need nothing more. You'll certainly not need the small diameter seat brace going up from that rear joint. Speaking of which I'd also suggest you add a couple of gussets to that rear joint underneath it to add a little extra strength. There's a lot of force going through those welds which is only to be expected as any recumbent design is using the metal as a beam. A pair of gussets will take a lot of that load from those welds. If your routes are smooth, your welding excellent and your weight average or less you'll not need them but I'd certainly recommend them anyway.
 
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Fibreglass seats are incredibly tolerant of mounting positions. I have four and two are mounted only 12" apart - once underneath and one on the lower back. They are strong enough to need nothing more. You'll certainly not need the small diameter seat brace going up from that rear joint. Speaking of which I'd also suggest you add a couple of gussets to that rear joint underneath it to add a little extra strength. There's a lot of force going through those welds which is only to be expected as any recumbent design is using the metal as a beam. A pair of gussets will take a lot of that load from those welds. If your routes are smooth, your welding excellent and your weight average or less you'll not need them but I'd certainly recommend them anyway.
Learning to weld, so, not excellent before the end of this project - I suppose. And then it will still take some time ;) Also the weight is a bit above average (92kg). The reinforcements I had in mind are two triangular pieces welded on sideways on the low end of the rear seat tube/center boom, plus two thin square pipes that connect the rear fork (from both sides) to the rear seat tube. And two additional pieces of steel in the sharp corner of the tadpoles arms. Just to be sure 🆒
 
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That's a fair bit of reinforcement, triangulates nicely and then reinforces the joint that the force is transferred to because of the triangulation. ie the bottom of the seat post. Make sure you weld the extra tubes on with your wheel present so they don't want the same space.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
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Location
Ohio
I found an easier way to get the measurements for the steering booms. I just Jons frame idea and made supports and used clamps to get the tubes in the right place and hold them still. I then used some scrap tube and cut a fish mouth cut and held it in place on the tube with a U clamp.


Then i clamped a yard stick to the bottom of it and lined it up to the mark on the frame and clamped it in place to the frame. The i took another piece of scrap and clamped it to the yard stick and drew a white line around all four sides. Then I measured from that white line, to the frame for each corner and then subtracted 1" from each and marked them on the scrap. Then connect the dots, cut and if it sits in place on the wood clamped and looks right, thenyou only need to take one measurement from the actual tube to the frame, transfer it to the real steering boom, cut and you're all set.
 
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Always more than one way to skin a cat. I suspect you own more clamps than most by some margin! Those tyres look very large.
 
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Sep 16, 2018
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BMX tires?
I used bmx tires on my trike. As I used them on a lower pressure, then the ride was smooth. The disadvantage was only that you get more toll in the corners.
But as you ride on bumpy roads, they work great.
 
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